Object Description

Xogram a photograph taken using Xrays and conventional photography. Edition of 50

Object History

Hugh trained as a designer / art director but on discovering photography he retrained under iconic photographer Gered Mankowitz. During 1996/1997 he started experimenting with x-ray/shadow photography after being asked to create an alternative ‘revealing’ image for an album cover. With the encouragement of the Science Photo Library he went on to produce an extensive series of coloured x-rays of everyday objects, which were first published on the 4 April 1999 in The Observer Magazine, LIFE, UK. In the same year Credit Suisse discovered Hughs x-ray vision and commissioned 6 ground breaking ‘motion x-ray’ European TV commercials.
I love using film.
The hands on approach and the manipulation of technique: overexposure, multiple exposure, chemical processing, filtering, rigs, mechanics, physics, happy accidents, trial and error and hand colouring.
I do not work exclusively with one set of x-ray equipment rather I tailor the equipment to requirement: for example to capture a small insect of low density is very different to that of capturing the high densities of a sports motorbike.
There is a technique to produce a photographic image without a camera by placing objects directly onto the surface of a photo-sensitive material such as photographic paper and then exposing it to light. These are called photograms (or as Man Ray called the “rayographs” ) and is one of the first photographic imaging techniques ever used by William Fox Talbot (and he called them “photogenic drawings”).
Simply put, the only difference between my x-ray images and the photograms produced by the early photographic pioneers is the frequency of the ‘light’ used to expose the ‘paper’. I have created (unlike the ‘Roentgenogram’ which is pertaining to the originators name) a more generic term ‘ XOGRAM ‘ to define my x-ray images within the context of my photographic background and the cross over of my visible light and x-ray images. I have also created the term ‘ XOGRAFIA ‘ to define the act of producing xograms.

Object Classification

Dealer Opening Times

We are open weekly as follows:

Monday
11:00 - 18:00
Tuesday
11:00 - 18:00
Wednesday
11:00 - 18:00
Thursday
11:00 - 18:00
Friday
11:00 - 18:00
Saturday
11:00 - 18:00
Sunday
Closed

Dealer Contact

Telephone
+44 (0)2075802118
Web
Email

Dealer Location

32 Store Street, Bloomsbury, London, United Kingdom. 5 Mins walk from the British Museum.