Antique George I Silver Salver

GBP 1,850.00

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Object Description

An early English silver salver of square form raised on shaped feet. This dainty size is often known as a waiter, perfect for standing a wine bottle or glass. To the centre is a hand engraved crest encircled by the motto “Ne Cede Malis”. Good colour.

Weight 153 grams, 4.9 troy ounces.
Width 14 cm.
London 1723.
Maker Joseph Clare.
Sterling silver.

Marks. Stamped around the top surface with a full set of clear English silver hallmarks.

Biography: Joseph Clare, apprenticed to Nathaniel Locke 1702., free 1712. 1st mark entered as largeworker 1713. 2nd (sterling mark) 1720. 3rd mark 1721. Died 1728.

Object Literature

From the 17th century until the reign of George I salvers were raised on a pedestal foot. This form is often called a “tazza”. By 1700 some were made with the foot unscrewing. Very occasionally this type will also have 3 or 4 feet so that the salver can be used on a lower level.

The traditional form of salver with plain flat surfaces and small feet at the edge, rarely found before the reign of George I, was made in various forms such as round, rectangular, oval and octagonal and are an ideal starting off point for collectors of early silver.

The term “waiter” is not commonly used but relates to small examples less than 6 or 7 inches; these have become very popular now to stand a bottle or wine glass.

Object Condition

This useful antique waiter is in very good condition. The crest is still sharp. Faint marks on the top surface where the feet are applied.

Object Details

Dealer Opening Times

By appointment only.

Dealer Contact

Telephone
+44 (0)207 288 1939
Mobile
+44 (0)7904 297419
Web
Email

Dealer Location

Vault 31-32
The London Silver Vaults
53-64 Chancery Lane
London WC2A 1QS

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