William and Mary Antique Silver Tazza

GBP 5,750.00

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Object Description

A fine quality antique silver footed salver with a gadroon edge and cut card applied work to the underside. A rare feature is the screw action detachable foot. Heavy gauge silver. Hand engraved to the top is a marital coat of arms.

Weight 575g, 18.4 troy oz.
Diameter 19cm. Height 7.5cm.
London 1692.
Maker Benjamin Pyne.
Sterling silver.

Marks. Stamped on the top with a full set of English silver hallmarks, lion mark to the foot.

Maker: Benjamin Pyne

Benjamin Pyne, apprenticed to George Bowers 1667, free 1676. The maker’s mark “single letter P under a crown”, found shortly after 1680, appears on the 1697 copper plate at the Goldsmith’s Hall, and reappears after 1720, again unentered, can safely be attributed to him. His only authenticated marks are two entered as a largeworker, undated, probably entered in 1697 on commencement of register. He held the position of Subordinate Goldsmith to the King for the coronation of George I only. His son Benjamin was apprenticed to him 21 October 1708, free 8 May 1716 and was elected Assistant Assayer in 1720. By the end of the seventeenth century Pyne was obviously, from his surviving work, a front ranking London goldsmith and shared with Anthony Nelme the main responsibility of upholding native standards against Huguenot competition, even though it’s more than likely that he and Nelme employed (or bought up and remarked the work of) the latter to some extent.

Pyne’s connection with Hoare’s bank seems to have continued for a considerable period and is perhaps responsible for the quantity of orders for municipal maces, regalia and church plate he obtained. However the end of his life was sad. On 17 January 1727, when he must have nearly been 75, he resigned from the Livery, probably due to ill health and bad eyesight, and petitioned with others for the place of Beadle to the Company, vacant by the death of John Bodington, and was elected the same day to the post.

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Object Literature

From the 17th century until the reign of George I salvers (often called tazzas) were raised on a pedestal foot. By 1700 some were made with the foot unscrewing. Very occasionally this type will also have 3 or 4 feet so that the salver can be used on a lower level.

Object Condition

This tazza is in very good condition with a moderate amount of wear consistent with age. The detachable screw foot works very well.

Object Details

Dealer Opening Times

By appointment only.

Dealer Contact

Telephone
+44 (0)207 288 1939
Mobile
+44 (0)7904 297419
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Dealer Location

Vault 31-32
The London Silver Vaults
53-64 Chancery Lane
London WC2A 1QS

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